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Lyft’s low-cost Shared Saver rides come to six more US cities

Lyft’s frugal Shared Saver option is now available to many more people. The ridesharing service ahs trotted out its most affordable option to six more large US cities, including Atlanta, Las Vegas, Miami, Philadelphia, San Francisco and Seattle. The principle remains the same: if you’re comfortable with both sharing a ride and walking short distances, you can save a bit of cash versus demanding exact pick-ups and drop-offs.

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Low-cost intervention boosts undergraduate interest in computer science

A recent study finds that an online intervention taking less than 30 minutes significantly increased interest in computer science for both male and female undergraduate students. However, when it comes to the intervention’s impact on classroom performance, the picture gets more complicated.

“Our focus was on determining how and whether a ‘growth mindset’ intervention would affect student interest and performance in computer science, so we developed an experiment that would allow us to explore those questions,” says Jeni Burnette, first author of a paper on the work and an associate professor of psychology at North Carolina State University.

“We knew from previous work in other contexts that a growth mindset — the belief that human attributes are malleable — can have significant consequences for self-regulation and goal achievement,” Burnette says. “In this instance, the growth mindset is that people can develop their computer science ability. Put another way, it’s the opposite of thinking that some people are talented at computer science and other people aren’t.”

For the study, researchers worked with 491 students taking introductory computer science courses at seven different universities. One group of 245 students was shown four online growth mindset modules over the course of the class, with each module focused on what growth mindsets are and stressing that anyone can learn computer science if they apply themselves. A control group of 246 students was shown four online modules that focused on student health, such as making sure to exercise and get enough sleep. Each module was fairly brief, with the total running time for all four growth mindset modules coming in at about 27 minutes.

All 491 students were surveyed before the intervention and after seeing all four modules. Surveys assessed each student’s interest in majoring or getting a job in computer science.

The researchers found that students who received the growth mindset intervention were more interested in computer science than students who received the control group intervention, even when accounting for their interest level prior to the intervention. What’s more, the increase in interest was identical for both male and female students who received the growth mindset intervention.

However, the intervention alone did not appear to have a direct impact on student performance in the computer science course. Though it’s not quite accurate to say that there was no effect.

“We did not get an immediate effect of the intervention on performance,” Burnette says. “But we did find that the growth mindset intervention led students to place more value on the course, meaning they thought the course was more important. And, we found that value correlated with students’ final grade in the class. So, there is a positive, indirect effect of the intervention on performance.”

The paper, “A Growth Mind-Set Intervention Improves Interest but Not Academic Performance in the Field of Computer Science,” is published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science. The paper was co-authored by Crystal Hoyt and Barry Lawson of the University of Richmond; V. Michelle Russell of the University of North Carolina Greensboro; Carol Dweck of Stanford University; and Eli Finkel of Northwestern University.

The work was done with support from the National Science Foundation, under grant number 1327561.

Story Source:

Materials provided by North Carolina State University. Original written by Matt Shipman. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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Uber expands low-cost ride subscription service to 17 more cities – CNET

Uber expands low-cost ride subscription service to 17 more cities – CNET
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Uber is expanding its subscription service.


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Uber’s subscription service is coming to more US cities.

The ride-sharing company said Tuesday that it’s expanding Ride Pass, which starts at $15 and limits the cost of fares.

The new locations include New York City, Dallas, San Diego, Seattle, San Antonio, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Orange County, Baltimore-Maryland, New Orleans, Nashville, Portland, Raleigh-Durham, St. Louis, Jacksonville and Memphis.

When Ride Pass was introduced back in October, it was only available in Los Angeles, Austin, Orlando, Miami and Denver. Your subscription won’t cover fares, but ensures you won’t have to pay surge pricing at peak times or in bad weather.

It applies to UberX and UberPool trips. The standard $15 per month cost jumps to $25 in LA, New York City (Bronx and Staten Island), Dallas, San Diego, Seattle, Phoenix, San Antonio and Nashville because you also get 30 minutes a day to ride Uber’s electric bikes and scooters for free.

“Signing up through the app is simple, and once riders get rolling they can track their savings on every ride with real-time updates,” wrote Dan Bilen, Uber’s product manager, in the post.


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Low-cost resilient houses could help Mozambique survive future storms

Low-cost resilient houses could help Mozambique survive future storms

As the city of Beira, Mozambique, reels from Cyclone Idai–90% of the city may be destroyed, and rescuers are still struggling to reach the thousands of people who have been displaced–it will eventually face another challenge: What’s the best way to rebuild a city where climate change is making intense storms commonplace?

Cyclones aren’t new on the coast of Mozambique. But climate change raises the risk of catastrophic floods there, just as it does in Miami or Houston. “A warmer ocean evaporates more moisture into the atmosphere. That means tropical storms pack a bigger punch in terms of how much moisture they contain and how much rainfall they can produce,” says Michael Mann, a professor of atmospheric science at Penn State University. “The warmer ocean also provides more energy to intensify tropical storms. That means bigger storm surges, further boosted by sea level rise.” In Mozambique, a long recent drought also left the soil hard and less able to absorb the rain dumped by Idai.

Beira, a city of a half million people, was hit by 100-mile-an-hour winds and more than seven inches of rain (other areas saw more than two feet of rain, or almost as much as the region would normally get in a year). After centuries of colonial rule followed by years of war, Mozambique is also one of the poorest countries in the world, and more than half of residents live below the poverty line, with few resources to prepare for storms. People typically build their own homes from the cheapest materials available. “They will use whatever means they have to build their house,” says Casimiro António, cofounder of the Arman Group, a Mozambique-based sustainable development consultancy, who previously worked with the development agency USAID.

[Photo: courtesy USAID Coastal City Adaptation Project]

For the last five years, USAID, along with the international development organization Chemonics, worked in three other coastal cities in Mozambique to help citizens begin to adapt to climate change. As one part of the project, they built 22 model homes to help demonstrate low-cost ways that homes could be designed to have a better chance of surviving storms, and taught builders and homeowners how to use those techniques.

Right now, a typical home can be easily damaged even in a relatively minor storm. But simple techniques can help. A foundation, which many homes lack, can be raised with compacted soil, stone, and cement to reduce the risk of flooding. Walls, built with local materials like coconut wood or bamboo, can be reinforced with diagonal poles. Roofs can be attached in ways that make them less likely to fly off in strong winds; they can also be redesigned to collect rainwater.

“It’s a combination of techniques that improve housing resilience,” says António. The techniques can make a house cost 25% more, but homeowners can save money over time by avoiding the need to rebuild; current homes are so flimsy that they need very frequent repairs. “If you build your house without following those resilient techniques, it means that every year you actually [might have to] rebuild your house,” he says.

[Photo: courtesyUSAID Coastal City Adaptation Project]

As more people move to cities like Beira, they’re forced to live wherever land is available, even if it’s particularly vulnerable to flooding or landslides. Some parts of Beira are already below sea level. “There are areas that are normally flooded,” he says. “People build in those areas because the city’s population continues to grow and they need to have houses.”

Before rebuilding happens, the city should map out the areas at highest risk and make it clear where it isn’t safe to build, he says. Beira and other coastal cities at high risk could also pursue other projects piloted in the USAID program, such as redesigning sanitation so latrines don’t pollute water when it floods, and strengthening communication systems to reach people during a disaster. And new homes need to be built to a higher standard.

“Now, with this crisis, it is creating an opportunity to avoid re-creating the risks,” António says.  Houses that are designed to be more resilient aren’t guaranteed to survive the most intense storms, but they make it much more likely–and if homes can withstand storms, that means that people are more likely to avoid disruptions like losing a job and deepening the cycle of poverty. More resilient homes could also save lives. “The event that just happened is a clear example that there is a need for houses to be built using resilient techniques,” he says.

There’s an argument to be made that the countries most responsible for climate change should be doing more to help cities like Beira adapt. “If we can bring carbon emissions down dramatically, we might be able to reduce the threat to our coastal cities,” says Mann. “But even from the warming that is already baked in, we are likely to see substantial additional sea-level rise, strengthening of storms, and more intense rainfall events. That means that we have to invest in greater resilience, and assist those in the developing world with the least resources and the greatest vulnerability.”

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12 Low-Cost Business Ideas for Introverts

12 Low-Cost Business Ideas for Introverts

Low-Cost Business Ideas

12 Low-Cost Business Ideas for Introverts

Image credit:

Hero Images | Getty Images


14 min read


If you identify as an introvert and are interested in your own low-cost startup, you could be an ideal candidate for starting your own business.

Introverts are powerful in their own right. They are productive thinkers with strong opinions who can achieve much. Despite what the media says — often stereotyping them as “shy” or “socially awkward” — introverts can make great business leaders and entrepreneurs. In fact, many successful business leaders are introverts, including Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and Warren Buffett.

Related: 9 Business Ideas Under $1,000 You Can Run From Anywhere

At least one-third of all Americans are introverts, says Susan Cain, author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking and the leading voice today on lost opportunities when undervaluing introverts.

“They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams,” she says.

Here’s a list of 12 low-cost business ideas under $1,000 to get you on your way.

Related: 10 Business Ideas to Make Easy Money and Change the World

Tech-related services

Tech-related services

Image credit:

Hero Images | Getty Images

Graphic designer

Startup costs: up to $1,000

Equipment: computer, design software

For highly creative and visual introverts, freelance graphic design can be a great way to make a living. With digital businesses on the rise, demand is higher than ever.

Jacob Cass is a graphic designer who started design business Just Creative in 2012. Solving clients’ business problems through visual communication such as creating logos, websites, stationery and marketing materials are only some of the many projects he undertakes on a daily basis.

“Web design can be self-taught — that’s how I learned,” Cass says. “You need to know software to do this, but most importantly you need to understand the principles of design as well as understand clients needs, not wants.”

It’s simple to get started. Cass registered his company with the government as a sole proprietorship, then began reaching out to clients. Both tasks that can be done from your computer. Other than acquiring certain software such as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign, startup costs were minimal, he says.

Related: 5 Low-Cost Franchises You Can Start for as Little as $4,000

Coder

Startup costs: up to $1,000

Equipment: computer, training courses

Detail-oriented and meticulous, introverts make excellent coders. The combination of patience and focus makes coding a great option for an introvert seeking self-employment. Because coding is such a niche skillset, there is high demand for freelance coders, and much of the work can be done from the comfort of your home.

It gets better. There is an abundance of free resources online such as Code Academy and Udemy where you can educate yourself. Also General Assembly offers one-shot classes and intensive six to 12 week training sessions online and in-class for a cost ranging from $140 to $3,500 — that’s what jumpstarted coder Yin Mei’s career.

Mei enrolled herself in a 12-week General Assembly Bootcamp where she developed the necessary skills to become a front-end developer. (Front-end development is the part of a website that you can see and interact with like fonts, drop-down menus, buttons, contact forms and other aesthetics of a site.) It requires fluency in HTML, CSS and JavaScript, plus coders should know front-end frameworks such as AngularJS and ReactJC.

To the contrary, back-end development refers to the “server-side” — basically everything you can’t see on a website. It operates the site with updates and changes made on the front-end. If it’s back-end developing you’re looking for, Java, Scala and Python are the primary languages. And don’t let those technical words scare you off.

“If you are a functional human being, you will be able to learn to code,” Mei says.

Related: Low Cost Business Ideas

Online retail consigner

Startup costs: up to $1,000

Equipment: digital camera, computer

Passion for fashion? Or just own way too many clothes you don’t need anymore? Rather than hoarding those unused belongings in your closet — or trashing them — sell them online. Online consignment offers introverts a great opportunity to make money through a completely virtual process. Today there are a number of online platforms — such as The RealReal, Tradesy and ThredUp — specific for selling your unwanted clothing, jewelry and accessories.

Linda Lightman, an eBay seller of 15 years, built an e-consignment empire, Linda’s Stuff, which currently brings in $25 million a year. She began her online career by simply selling her son’s old video games, eventually moving to items in her closet and later selling items for friends.

It only took passion and a can-do attitude for Lightman to start her business, now operated out of a 93,000-square-foot office space in Hatboro, Pennsylvania. “I was always so passionate about fashion and for me it was a no-brainer,” she tells Daily Mail.

Startup materials? You will need a computer and a camera to take photos of your clothing. The rest is easy. Do your research, pick a great user ID or name for your shop, using quality images and vivid descriptions of what you’re selling and providing online customer service. And once you get the hang of it, you’ll be able to start selling for others too!  

Related: Why Freelancing Is Perfect for Introverts

Instagram consultant

Startup costs: $100 to $500

Equipment: smartphone with a good digital camera

Social media doesn’t necessarily mean “social.” Many businesses today have abandoned traditional marketing methods and taken to social media networks such as the ever-popular Instagram to promote their products and services. A majority of companies may not be well-versed in this new marketing technique, which is why outsourcing an Instagram consultant is often a great option.

Instagram consultant Emelina Spinelli helps firms grow a sustainable Instagram following and influence. She’s passionate about the photo app and providing resources for others to learn about this unique and extremely popular social channel, which has over 1 billion users worldwide.

Like Spinelli, if you have a love of Instagram, knowledge of basic marketing and simply, motivation, Instagram consulting can be a great path for you. You’ll be able to monetize these skills by charging a flat rate per project or by the hour. Market and promote your services online, blog on other related sites providing free tips (don’t give all the secrets away) and, ironically, using social media channels, build a following and reach out to businesses or individuals. All of which will come with little to no startup costs.

Related: Need a Business Idea? Here Are 55.

Writing service

Writing service

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Hero Images | Getty Images

Writer/copy writer

Startup costs: up to $1,000

Equipment: computer

You don’t need to be a best-selling author to craft a compelling narrative. If you’ve got the drive, copywriting is a great option for many introverts. Megan Hill has been a freelance copywriter for 13 years. She’s written for a number of publications, from Upscale Living Magazine to Forbes Travel Guide.

Although freelance writing doesn’t require a formal education, it does require a certain level of motivation. Networking and marketing are key to get your name out there and pick up projects, which Hill was able to do mostly online by creating a website and social media accounts.

“[Being] driven, focused, organized and able to go with the flow,” are what it takes to become a good copywriter, Hill explains. For a writing career that exists almost entirely online, costs are minimal, she adds.

Related: 5 Affordable Franchises You Can Start for Less Than $10,000

Online blogger

Startup costs: up to $1,000

Equipment: computer

Have a specific interest but don’t know how to make money from it? Blog about it!

Many successful entrepreneurs have found success in blogging. As a marketing blogger and owner of Fluxe Digital Marketing, Joel Widmer says that writing, editing, copywriting and marketing are requirements for a successful blogger. It helps to have good content marketing skills, such as knowing how to create content that will engage readers and meet your client’s goal and knowing how much content to give away — and Google analytic skills too — if you want to be a marketing blogger like Widmer.

All you really need is a computer and good internet connection to start. Today, there are plenty of platforms (mostly free too) that will basically build your blog for you — all you have to do is add information about who you are and what your blog is about and start writing.

To build a strong client list, Widmer recommends blogging for other people and companies for free. Once you’ve developed deep personal connections with these people and/or brands — which introverts are naturally inclined to do — you’ll grow your network and can begin charging as a contributing blogger for others’ sites.

Related: 4 Networking Tips for Introverts

Technical writer  

Startup costs: up to $1,000

Equipment: computer

As naturally deep thinkers with the tendency to connect things in their minds, introverts who have a good understanding of technology make great technical writers. Amy Winkler, a technical writer for more than 18 years, in 1999 helped launch Alva Consulting, Inc., a firm for technical and business communications. Winkler says that a day for her can consist of writing content for software user guides, online help, FAQ’s, job aids and instructional designs.

If you can write, interview subject matter experts, be organized and have flexibility, then you have the potential to be a great technical writer, Winkler says. There’s no specific academic route to develop skills as a technical writer except writing and the ability to pick up technology software quickly.

Winkler, who’s had much success as a technical writer, went to business school. Freelance technical writers are highly sought after in a variety of company, from Fortune 500 companies to smaller technology startups, most are willing to pay big bucks.

Fashion and the arts

Fashion and the arts

Image credit:

Aliyev Alexei Sergeevich | Getty Images

Landscape photographer

Startup costs: up to $1,000

Equipment: high-quality digital camera

Landscape photography takes focus and observation, qualities many introverts naturally embody. Opportunities for a landscape photographer can be enormous, and there’s immense room for learning. There are a number of ways to generate income from being a photographer: shooting for websites or publications, selling prints or usage rights of your images or, if you’re skilled enough, offering classes to other aspiring photographers.

Today, the internet makes it easy as ever to market your services. Jason Benjamin has been a fashion and wedding photographer for six years and has run his own company, Wedding Headline, for four. He markets his services on social media, a great way for introverts to build a client list.

“Anyone can be a photographer, depending on your level of creativity. … I am completely self taught,” Benjamin says. “I went to school for software engineering to write code. I taught myself everything I know about photography using YouTube.”

The steps to create his business were simple: coming up with a name and purchasing an LLC. Although equipment can be expensive, there are alternative ways to keep down costs — renting equipment and studio space is a viable way to save money in the beginning.

Related: 

Music teacher

Startup costs: up to $100

Equipment: musical instrument, sheet music

Stick to something you know and love. You’ve spent years — maybe decades — of your life developing your skills as a musician. So why not make money while doing it?

That’s what musician-turned-music teacher Kaila McIntyre-Bader did. After getting her bachelor’s degree in music, this music lover took her fine-tuned talents to the classroom, where she taught private lessons as well as voice and flute classes at Red House Studios, a music school, concert venue and recording studio based out of Walnut Creek, California.

Teaching and creativity are the main components of being an excellent music teacher. As an introvert, using personal knowledge to help others and developing deep one-on-one relationships with students and peers is a major strength. By creating individualized curricula for each student and asking them about their goals, McIntyre-Bader helps students “achieve the level of musicianship they desire.”

As a musician, it’s likely you already have the instruments and gear you need to jumpstart your teaching career. Startup costs are limited, according to McIntyre-Bader. For the most part, all you would be paying for is gas driving to and from students’ homes, or you can simply teach out of your own home.

Consulting services and education

Consulting services and education

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Shutterstock

Business and life counselor

Startup costs: up to $1,000

Equipment: life coach certification (not required)

Introverts are great at listening to and empathizing with people. Author of The Successful Introvert: How to Enhance Your Job Search and Advance Your Career Wendy Gelberg says introverts tend to have a calm demeanor, they think before they act and speak and they use analysis and thought to add an important dimension to any situation. Their ability to internalize events and closely listen to others make them great for a career in consulting.

Business and life coach Val Nelson began her self-employment journey in 2009 by coaching people to thrive in business as well improve their lives. As an introvert herself, her listening and empathy skills drove her decision to help others. Nelson chose to get life-coach training, which took her six months and cost her around $5,000 — something she recommends — although you are not required by law to get certification to call yourself a “life coach.”

“Good coaching training combined with strong business experience” is what it takes to excel as a successful life coach, explains Nelson, who adds that the “overhead for a coaching business can be fairly low.”

Another plus: most coaches work solely through the phone or online with their clients — a setting that most introverts thrive in.

Related: 75 Ideas for Businesses You Can Launch for Cheap or Free

College application advisor

Startup costs: up to $1,000

Equipment: computer

Rather than working in groups, introverts typically prefer to build deeper one-on-one connections with individuals. Often possessing an ability to provide thoughtful advice through planning and research, an introvert makes an excellent college application advisor.

Gael Casner has been an independent educational consultant for 14 years through her business, College Find. Helping students explore educational options, creating college lists for students, reviewing admissions essays and helping students narrow their options to make a final decision are only a few of the things Casner does on a daily basis.

She develops relationships with parents and students, and spends much of her time researching colleges and industry trends. Like Casner, if you do your research as well as get to know the strengths of your students, you’ll be able to successfully guide them toward their future while generating some income for yourself.

A quick way to find clients is to tap into some school networks in your area and get your name out there. It starts with a simple email. Setting up a time to meet with the local principal of some schools and faculty members to introduce yourself and your services will help build your credibility and rapport with parents, plus create partnerships with schools for referrals.

Related: 5 Franchises You Can Buy for Less Than $18,000

Online tutor

Startup costs: up to $1,000

Equipment: computer

Creating your own online tutoring business is a great way to explore your intelligence and provide assistance to others. Carl Arnold is an online tutor helping middle and high school students develop composition skills, as well as assisting with application essays for aspiring college students.

You too could hone in on your academic specialties and use them to teach and guide students. Arnold communicates with students through phone, Skype or email, so for those introverts who thrive in a virtual medium, this career path could be a great option.

With fees ranging from $65 to $80 an hour depending on a student’s needs — sought-after SAT and standardized testing tutors can charge up to $150 an hour — you can charge per session or offer a package deal, which also covers the costs of materials.

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9 Low-Cost Business Ideas for College Students

9 Low-Cost Business Ideas for College Students

Low-Cost Business Ideas

It can be difficult for students to balance a part-time job with a heavy class schedule. Here are nine low-cost business ideas for under $100.

9 Low-Cost Business Ideas for College Students

Image credit:

Todor Tsvetkov | Getty Images


10 min read


It takes money to have fun in college, and it’s no secret that tuition and costs go up every year. But with classes scattered throughout the day and even at night, how can you add a job? That’s why more and more college students are opting to go into starting their own business to fit their skills and limited time.

Here are nine ideas for low-cost businesses that you can build while still in college.

9 Low-Cost Business Ideas for College Students

Residential cleaning service

Residential cleaning service

Image credit:

heshphoto | Getty Images

In search of a part-time job that caters to your busy class schedule? A residential cleaning service can be a viable option.

In 2009, 21-year-old Kristen Hadeed posted an online ad offering residential cleaning services. After successfully cleaning her first home, Hadeed was able to build her network of clients solely off referrals. 

“With cleaning, it’s a trust thing. When you trust someone, they’ll refer you,” explains Hadeed.

Cleaning homes granted Hadeed the flexibility to balance a heavy academic schedule while maintaining a part-time job based on her own availability. She eventually recruited other students to join her business, founding one of Florida’s largest independently owned cleaning services, Student Maid.

In the beginning stages, keep it simple, advises Hadeed, starting with an online ad for your services. From there, the opportunities should flow. To avoid heavy startup costs, require all of your clients to supply the majority of the cleaning supplies and use recyclable rags and a diluted white vinegar solution to clean.

For residential cleaning services, you can charge starting at $20 an hour. Other advice? Always overestimate the amount of time it will take to clean, and charge an hourly rate in case you’ve got a large space.

9 Low-Cost Business Ideas for College Students

Moving service

Moving service

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Juice Images | Getty Images

Whether moving back for the fall semester or moving home for the summer, movers can make an incredible income helping on-the-go students. A mover can make up to $200 for a single job. Stephen Vlahos and Cameron Doody noticed this need and created Bellhops, a student moving service that’s expanded nationwide.

“It’s twice what students could make working at a pizza shop, plus they get regular tips,” Doody told Pando. “And they can work whenever they want.”

What’s the catch? Being a mover is hard work and involves a lot of heavy lifting, so having the ability to move large items and furniture with ease is a must.

Joining or starting a business like Bellhops, where you’re able to have flexible hours and build your own schedule, can be great for college students. If you’ve got a large network already, spreading your services through word-of-mouth, social media, online ads, flyers and a website can jump start your entrepreneurial career for little to no startup money.

9 Low-Cost Business Ideas for College Students

Child caretaker

Child caretaker

Image credit:

Caiaimage/Paul Bradbury | Getty Images

Good with kids? A position as a babysitter or nanny could be the perfect opportunity for a college student seeking a part-time job. Whether it’s taking care of kids on date night or picking them up from school, there’s a constant demand for babysitters.

Web babysitting services like SitterCity.com and Care.com make it simple and easy to promote your services and tap into a network of busy parents. Many colleges also offer their own career listing sites that connect students to local babysitting and nannying opportunities, though the best way to pick up new gigs is often through trusted referrals.

Babysitting involves an incredible amount of responsibility, so it’s important to have confidence in your skills as a caregiver. Providing a background check and taking first aid and babysitting training classes are great places to start.

Babysitting rates can vary between $8 to $40 an hour depending on your experience, the city you live in, children’s ages, number of children and the amount of responsibility involved (driving, cooking meals, handling pets, etc.).

9 Low-Cost Business Ideas for College Students

Tutor

Tutor

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Prasit photo | Getty Images

If you’re in school, chances are you can pull your weight in at least one subject. Whether it’s math, essay writing or chemistry — or even standardized testing — use your knowledge to make money and teach others who might be struggling in the areas in which you excel.

There will probably always be a high demand for tutors in college, and the resources for promoting your services are expansive. Students who wish to pursue a job as a tutor have multiple options, such as tutoring through a college’s peer-tutoring center. By applying and registering as a tutor at your school, you’ll be able to earn extra cash without having to market your services yourself. If you wish to go independent, find out if your school has an online community board where you can post your services and rates, or go into your student center and library and leave fliers at the front desk.

If you excel in a certain subject, talk with the relevant professors to see if they’ll help spread the word. Many schools often allow you to officially register as a tutor so that students are able to look up your information on the school’s website.

Also, consider tutoring high school students in your area. One area particularly in demand is SAT tutoring for both the general SAT and specialized subjects. Nationally recognized SAT prep companies such as Kaplan and The Princeton Review list available job opportunities on their websites for tutors around the United States.

Tutors can charge anywhere from $10 to $100 per hour depending on subject matter and the city; however, the going rate for SAT tutors tends to skew higher. Look up what tutors are charging in your area before setting your rate.  

9 Low-Cost Business Ideas for College Students

Event organizer/promoter

Event organizer/promoter

Image credit:

Brandon Stachnik

It’s undeniable that a number of college students get wrapped up in their school’s social scene. Why not capitalize on it?

During his junior year in college, Alex Sanchez cofounded Edgework Entertainment, an event management, promotion and consulting startup. Sanchez noticed an unmet demand for off-campus events in the community.

To bridge the gap, he networked with local venue owners and musicians by acting as a liaison between local entertainers and venues. He was also able to plan and execute successful events that his company promoted on-campus through guerilla marketing tactics, such as passing out fliers, putting up posters and speaking to students one-on-one to create buzz among the student body.

The compoany also utilized major social media channels and created a website to get word out to the community.

It could be considered a win-win for all parties: Venues attracted more customers, musicians received exposure and Edgework Entertainment took a percentage of cover charges and ticket sales.

“Find the right people to work with and make sure you have good chemistry. Everyone is painting a small part of a larger picture so communication is key,” says Sanchez.

On top of exceptional communication skills, having organizational skills as well as a grasp on the fundamentals of business, marketing and finance are necesssary as an event organizer.

9 Low-Cost Business Ideas for College Students

Résumé writing service

Résumé writing service

Image credit:

Pali Rao | Getty Images

Whether applying for a summer internship or preparing for life after college, a majority of college students need a well-written résumé. Internship and job opportunities are competitive, and the way a résumé looks and reads can make or break a student’s chances for a position at his or her dream company.

First and foremost, it’s important that your résumé be impeccable so you can guarantee your services to other students. Go into your school’s campus career counseling center to learn about résumé writing, and perfect your own. The internet will also be your primary tool to help with research of résumé formatting.

If you’re an excellent writer with a sharp eye for how to organize information clearly, résumé writing is an easy opportunity for you to help others and make money on your own time.

Professional résumé writers can charge hundreds of dollars per résumé; however, as a college student catering to other young up and comers, start off by keeping your hourly rate fairly low (maybe between $15 and $20 per job).

9 Low-Cost Business Ideas for College Students

Bookkeeping

Bookkeeping

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Johnnie Davis | Getty Images

Oftentimes when you think of bookkeeping, numbers, math, accounting and finance pop into your head. However, you don’t need to be a finance major to pursue a job as a bookkeeper.

According to Ben Robinson, a certified public accountant and business owner, having a basic knowledge of accounting may be helpful, but it’s not a necessity upfront. If you have decent computer skills and the ability to navigate real-world problems, bookkeeping could be a great option for you.

All businesses are required to maintain bookkeeping records, so there is always a demand for bookkeepers; outsourcing a college student as a bookkeeper is an easy way for companies (especially smaller ones) to limit costs and avoid hiring an expensive professional.

Startup costs are low. They include software such as QuickBooks or Xero, which cost anywhere from $5 to $70 per month, and marketing your services to businesses through job listings, referrals or your in-school network. Robinson recommends charging around $60 per hour for bookkeeping services, although this fee can vary depending on the complexity of the work and the extent of your experience. Consider starting out with a lower price, and after you build your skills and referral base, you can increase your prices. 

9 Low-Cost Business Ideas for College Students

Jewelry maker

Jewelry maker

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Hero Images | Getty Images

You don’t need to be a world-class jeweler to start your own jewelry line. LeiLei Secor, founder of Designed by Lei, started off by making simple knot friendship bracelets. Years later, Secor began making wire-wrap jewelry, which she began to sell on Etsy, an e-commerce platform that charges a small fee per listing.

Without any formal education in business, Secor learned how to sell online by doing thorough research and watching online tutorials, which she recommends to any aspiring jewelry maker.

“I also focused a lot of on photography,” she says. “I think great photos are one of the most important aspects to successfully selling online.”

Focusing primarily on Etsy search engine optimization and promoting designs on social media platforms is the best way to drive traffic to your products, Secor advises.

Startup costs are minimal; creating an Etsy account is completely free, and listing an item is $0.20/listing. The kind of jewelry you make will determine the cost of materials — for example, if you wish to work with wire, you will need basic wire wrap tools that come bundled in a kit, such as a wire cutter and several types of pliers.

Avoid using expensive materials such as real gold and silver or precious stones. You can upgrade your materials once you’ve started selling your items online and have built up a reserve.

9 Low-Cost Business Ideas for College Students

Delivery and errand service

Delivery and errand service

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PeopleImages | Getty Images

Starting a delivery service that offers running errands, picking up takeout or even going grocery shopping for a busy professional or someone who is elderly is a great way to make extra cash.

Like the leading food-delivery services, Postmates or Seamless, you can make a fortune doing tasks for others, especially if you go to a smaller school in an area where these food-delivery services don’t exist yet.

Start by setting up a website where people can place orders. For a low fee, there are a number of platforms already available that make this step simple such as 1&1TemplateMonster and GoDaddy.

Save all receipts and charge customers after you’ve completed a task — and add a 20 percent fee to the total costs of a purchase to generate your revenue. Market your services through word-of-mouth, fliers and social media pages.

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